EN/JP

IN BETWEEN   

In between cultures and spaces
On the day of the shooting, I visited this house for the first time in a long time, and as I was preparing for the shoot, an elderly man who happened to be walking by with his dog at this time said to me, "This house looks modern and classic. I was surprised to hear the word "classic," but began to think about its meaning.
The site is located in the southern part of Tokyo, and it is a two-family house for a family that has lived in the area for generations. The site is long from east to west, and considering the diagonal restriction* on the north side, the building had to be pulled to the south if it was to be built three stories high at full volume. In order to bring in enough light under these conditions, a reflective wall (flying wall) was installed on the north side of the second floor, which also serves as a blindfold from the neighboring houses.
In the Buddhist room on the first floor, the reflected light fills the room with light from the high side light on the north side.
In the bedroom and bathroom on the second floor, this flying wall serves as a blindfold from the neighboring house.
On the other hand, in the north garden in front of the bedroom on the first floor, the flying wall is like a shoji screen by Enshu Kobori,Kohoan*** blocking the view upward to the garden that extends to the boundary wall of the property.
The quality of space that makes this architecture possible is born from the relationship between the spaces sandwiched between the flying walls, which is the reason why I named it "IN BETWEEN.


Inspired by the man's words mentioned at the beginning of this article, I took a fresh look at the architecture and found that the front of the building is based on a square with the same height and width, and the order is a combination of 2:3 rectangles. I realized that there was a relationship in this plan that resonated with the IDEA of a numerical universe. In addition, I intended to lighten the impression of the building by making the surface facing the front of the frame white, but I realized that this was a conscious attempt to create a facade in the classical sense. It may have been a salute to the city.As a fragment of a distant memory, the Church of San Sebastiano in Alberti** came to my mind.
I can't help but think that a passerby came to inform me that this was an idea born unconsciously IN-BETWEEN modernity and classicism.

*In Japan, as urban areas have become taller and taller since the 1970s, disputes have frequently arisen due to shade. In order to prevent conflicts and ensure sunlight to neighboring houses, it was decided that buildings should be constructed under the diagonal lines rising from the northern neighboring land boundary. As a result, when building a third floor or more, the building has to be built closer to the south, which is a strange situation.


In between cultures and spaces
On the day of the shooting, I visited this house for the first time in a long time, and as I was preparing for the shoot, an elderly man who happened to be walking by with his dog at this time said to me, "This house looks modern and classic. I was surprised to hear the word "classic," but began to think about its meaning.
The site is located in the southern part of Tokyo, and it is a two-family house for a family that has lived in the area for generations. The site is long from east to west, and considering the diagonal restriction* on the north side, the building had to be pulled to the south if it was to be built three stories high at full volume. In order to bring in enough light under these conditions, a reflective wall (flying wall) was installed on the north side of the second floor, which also serves as a blindfold from the neighboring houses.
In the Buddhist room on the first floor, the reflected light fills the room with light from the high side light on the north side.
In the bedroom and bathroom on the second floor, this flying wall serves as a blindfold from the neighboring house.
On the other hand, in the north garden in front of the bedroom on the first floor, the flying wall is like a shoji screen by Enshu Kobori,Kohoan*** blocking the view upward to the garden that extends to the boundary wall of the property.
The quality of space that makes this architecture possible is born from the relationship between the spaces sandwiched between the flying walls, which is the reason why I named it "IN BETWEEN.



Inspired by the man's words mentioned at the beginning of this article, I took a fresh look at the architecture and found that the front of the building is based on a square with the same height and width, and the order is a combination of 2:3 rectangles. I realized that there was a relationship in this plan that resonated with the IDEA of a numerical universe. In addition, I intended to lighten the impression of the building by making the surface facing the front of the frame white, but I realized that this was a conscious attempt to create a facade in the classical sense. It may have been a salute to the city.As a fragment of a distant memory, the Church of San Sebastiano in Alberti** came to my mind.
I can't help but think that a passerby came to inform me that this was an idea born unconsciously IN-BETWEEN modernity and classicism.

*In Japan, as urban areas have become taller and taller since the 1970s, disputes have frequently arisen due to shade. In order to prevent conflicts and ensure sunlight to neighboring houses, it was decided that buildings should be constructed under the diagonal lines rising from the northern neighboring land boundary. As a result, when building a third floor or more, the building has to be built closer to the south, which is a strange situation.


Location:Tokyo, Program:Two-family house Structure:Rainforced concrete + Steel frame, Total floor area:238.1m², Architects:Yaita and Associates, Principal in Charge:Hisaaki Yaita + Naoko Yaita, Project Architect:Shota Onuma.Kurihara Yoshiko Land scape:HAKONE UEKI LANDSCAPE CONSTRUCTION Co.,Ltd. Structural engineer:Office PLUS ONE Co.,Ltd. Mechanical engineer:Shimazu Design Office Ltd. General contractor:WATANABE TOMI CORPORATION Photos: Shigeo Ogawa
* Shinkenchikusha
**Yaita and Associates Published:・JUTAKUTOKUSHU Nov 2021